THE POWER OF ADVERTISING

par MISS CONRARD  -  28 Octobre 2021, 19:44  -  #dnmade

INTRODUCTION: The brief History of Advertising

READ AND LEARN MORE ABOUT BRANDALISM HERE:

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ART IS EVERYWHERE PROJECT HERE:

AMERICAN ICONS

Norman Rockwell, A natural storyteller

Key question: How did Norman Rockwell hook customers?

Background information

Background information

The barefoot boy, 1931

The barefoot boy, 1931

THE POWER OF ADVERTISING

Watch the video and be ready to talk about:

the Coca Cola company mystery

the year 1928

the public reaction to Rockwell and his ads at the time

the originality of the last illustration

Go on your EDPUZZLE ACCOUNT and answer the questions...

THE POWER OF ADVERTISING

Mission 1 : ‘Dream Crazy’ commercial

Task 1 : Watch the commercial.

Who and what did you see? List the various steps of the commercial.

Then, in groups, gather the information you have found and share them with your class.

 

HOMEWORK: In your "Additional information" paper, you will find words or expressions that will help you fill the following crosswords. Good luck 😁

EXTRA WATCHING FOR THE MOST COURAGEOUS ONES:

AMERICAN ICONS

Norman Rockwell, a natural Storyteller

How did Norman Rockwell hook customers?

The Barefoot Boy, By Norman Rockwell

The Barefoot Boy, By Norman Rockwell

ADVERTISING AND FICTION

BRAND ALPHABET QUIZ

BRAND ALPHABET QUIZ

THE POWER OF ADVERTISING
THE POWER OF ADVERTISING
THE POWER OF ADVERTISING
THE POWER OF ADVERTISING
THE POWER OF ADVERTISING
THE POWER OF ADVERTISING

A MOTHER'S TRUE ACCOUNT

Advertising has an influence on everyone in one way or another, but it especially has had an influence on my children. Catchy jingles, cute slogans, and cartoon characters are all key factors that have hooked my children on certain products. Advertising influences the toys they want, the clothes they wear, and the food they eat. Advertising influences my children's choice of toys. If a television commercial displays children laughing and playing, my children think it must be a great toy, regardless of the type. For example, my three-year-old desperately wants a skateboard for Christmas. Every time he sees a skateboard commercial, he gets excited. He believes that if he had a skateboard, he would instantly have the same fun and skill as the boys on television. He also wants a fingernail kit. He does not know what a fingernail kit is, but he likes the glitter and stickers the commercial shows. The more appealing the commercial is, the more he wants the toy. Another influence advertising has had is on the clothes my children want to wear. Clothes from Wal-Mart and K-Mart are no longer satisfactory. Brand names such as GAP, Tommy Hilfiger, and American Eagle are much more appealing to them. My teenage daughter is constantly looking through catalogues and magazines, examining each outfit down to the last detail. She continuously wants to change her wardrobe to keep up with the latest fashion trends and most popular brand names. Of course, clothes endorsed by celebrities are always at the top of her shopping list. Last, advertising influences the food my children want to eat. Cartoon characters are placed on boxes of foods such as crackers and cereal to influence young children. For instance, I was grocery shopping with my young son the other day, and he asked me if I would buy him some yogurt to have for breakfast. I reached for the cheapest brand off the shelf and was about to put it in the cart when he said, "I want the Rugrats' yogurt." I had no idea what he was talking about until he pointed to the shelf behind me. There I saw a six-pack container of yogurt with pictures of Rugrats characters on the label. I tried to convince him that the yogurt I had picked up, which happened to be a dollar cheaper, would taste the same. After arguing back and forth, I finally gave in and purchased the more expensive Rugrats yogurt. As we continued shopping, he also spotted Blues Clues applesauce, Hot Wheels fruit snacks, and CatDog cheese-crackers on the shelves and wanted me to purchase those as well. I found myself once again trying to explain to a three-year-old that all the items taste the same as the generic or store brands. As long as companies continue to target our youth with advertising jingles, slogans, and cartoon characters, my children will continue to be influenced. The toys they want, the clothes they wear, and the food they want to eat will be determined by the product with the most advertising appeal.

"Television and Media - The Power of Advertising." 123HelpMe.com. 30 Sep 2015

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